Predicting trouble: EEG, NO and stroke

We’ve recently published a paper titled “Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage” on how electroencephalography (EEG for short) can be used to figure out which patients with a certain type of stroke (subarachnoid hemorrhage) will develop a complication after the initial brain bleed and which will not.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a type of stroke that can happen at any age. It is a bleed on the surface of the brain, in a space between the arachnoid membrane and the pia mater surrounding the brain (see figure below).

Meninges-en

The bleed is usually caused by an aneurysm (a bulging, weak section of a blood vessel) bursting, causing blood to escape into the subarachnoid space. Here, it puts pressure on the brain tissue (causing tissue damage) which can also reduce blood flow to other parts of the brain (causing lack of oxygen and cell death). The released blood may be toxic to the brain tissue and could cause inflammation. At worst, a subarachnoid hemorrhage results in death or severe brain damage.

Some of the damage is caused directly by the bleed (e.g. the pressure on the brain), and some is caused by how the bleed disrupts the normal control of blood flow in the brain. In particular, it is bad when the nitric oxide pathway stops functioning properly. Nitric oxide helps preserve the circulation in small blood vessels in the brain, partly through enlarging the blood vessels (vasodilation) and lowering the gathering of blood-clot forming platelets. After a bleed, nitric oxide levels in the brain are often reduced. This could be because hemoglobin in the blood stops enzymes responsible for producing nitric oxide from working properly. Another contributing factor is that the nitric oxide that is already present in the brain reacts with superoxide (part of the immune response) which leads to the levels of nitric oxide being even further lowered.

Nitric oxide disruption appears to be involved in delayed cerebral ischemia, which is the most common complication after a subarachnoid hemorrhage. For example, people with genetically lower activity in an enzyme that produces nitric oxide have a higher risk of this complication. Delayed cerebral ischemia is the unpredictable lack of oxygen to the brain leading to severe, even fatal, brain damage. This typically happens 3-14 days after the initial subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Which brings us to our question:

Patients who have the same clinical severity, no measurable genetic differences in nitric oxide production, and who seem exactly the same can go on to show very different outcomes. One can develop ischemia and suffer devastating new brain injuries, and the other return to normal without complications. How can we tell who will get it and who will not?

EEG measures neuronal (electrical) activity using electrodes placed on your scalp. It picks up fluctuations in voltage from the electric currents in the neurons, and in the clinical setting it is used to measure the spontaneous electrical activity in a brain over time. Different parts of the brain generate different signals. Some parts show signal with low frequencies (long waves, delta and theta frequencies) and some with short frequencies (rapid waves, alpha frequencies). The signal is linked to blood flow. In subarachnoid hemorrhage, it can be used to see cerebral ischemia develop naturally at an early stage, because as the blood flow is reduced, short frequencies begin to fade and long frequencies steadily increase. In short, the ratio of alpha to delta (for example), will be reduced in the ischemic patients. However, it can take several days of recording to get a result with this method. It is possible, but not practical.

However, we know that nitric oxide disruption seems to be critically involved in delayed cerebral ischemia. This means that we can give patients a nitric oxide donor (sodium nitrite) to stimulate the nitric oxide pathway, and use EEG to measure how well they respond. By doing this, we can speed the process up. We can see if the patient responds well to the sodium nitrite, or not. This means, in short, that we can see which patients show nitric oxide pathway disruption.

Using this method, we showed in our paper that patients who later went on to develop delayed cerebral ischemia showed no change (or a decrease) in the EEG signal whilst infused with sodium nitrite. Those that did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia did the exact opposite, and showed a strong increase in EEG signal.

temp3EEG spectrograms from a patient that did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia, and one who did, plus a scatter plot with the group differences in spectrogram ratio (alpha delta ratio (ADR))

So we have not only shown how the nitric oxide pathway is important in the development of delayed cerebral ischemia, but this also means we now quite possibly may be able to relatively quickly determine who is at risk for this life-threatening complication, and who is not.

Reference: Garry, P.S., Rowland, M.J., Ezra, M., Herigstad, M., Hayen, A., Sleigh, J.W., Westbrook. J., Warnaby, C.E. and Pattinson, K.T.S. (2016) Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000001950

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